email: geoff@cultureofus.com

Creating a coaching culture

As a keen Australian rules football (AFL) supporter, I loved this article mapping out coaching dynasty’s that exist in AFL football. The basic premise of the article suggests great coaches aren’t born, they are bred.

After reading this I thought about the challenge of building good coaching and leadership in organizations today. For the most part there is not the same public scrutiny and very visible performance data available on our companies leaders as there is with any major league sport, but there are definitely similar challenges. How do you reinforce the same themes and key messages week on week, and still keep your team engaged? How do you provide feedback, build confidence and the capability of your team? How do you make the right choices at the selection table?

Clearly there are some common themes and challenges for organization and sport. So what are the common attributes that separate a dynasty successful coach from a regular coach? Here’s three themes I believe are key:

Positive role models

Of all the key attributes behind a good coach, providing a positive role model is a prime factor in establishing a coaching dynasty. Approximately 90% of what we learn is through our experience and observation. It is then no coincidence that the writer of the AFL coaches article observed many of the top coaches in AFL had all been exposed to at least one of the great coaches that came before them. Through observation and indoctrination of successful coaching practices, they were able to learn their coaching craft and also become very successful coaches.

A winning culture

Successful coaches set up their teams for success by creating a winning culture, by reinforcing some very clear standards of behavior, which become part of the fabric of how a team behave. It is then by no means a coincidence that coaches whom are a part of and have experienced a successful coach learn the power of establishing a winning culture that builds accountability, trust and loyalty amongst a team.

Story tellers

AFL football can be a very complex and intricate game, yet teams play it best when the do the routine, basic things required by the game in a consistant and repetitive fashion. Coaches therefore need to rely on simple messages, retold and reinforced many different ways, reinforcing what needs to be done on a week in, week out basis. Like any job, football can be monatonous, so the challenge as a leader is to be able to help their team members understand and be inspired to change or maintain their behavour in order for them to become a more successful team. Consistency and quality require a fair degree of repetition no matter what the profession. Being able to learn new perspectives and new insights from great story tellers, supports not only successful teams, but role models to a future generation of coaches.

What other themes do you believe should be here? I look forward to your comments.

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